James Avery Birthstones

Find Something Special for Every Month of the Year

James Avery's birthstone jewelery for January

January

Garnet

Garnet traces its roots to the Nile Delta in 3100 B.C., where Egyptian artisans would craft the gemstone into beads or inlay them into hand-wrought jewelry. Legend proclaims this jewel had the ability to illuminate the night sky. Stories of The Ark say Noah used garnet as a lamp on his bow as he cast about on the ocean. Garnet received its name from the ancient Greeks because the color reminded them of the “granatum,” or the pomegranate seed. The garnets in jewelry designed by James Avery are generally in the red-violet to red-brown color range. Garnets mainly come from the east Coast of Africa. Small deposits are found in the United States and the Czech Republic. Garnet ranks 7 to 7.5 on the Mohs Scale of Hardness.

James Avery's birthstone jewelery for February

February

Amethyst

Treasured by ancient kings and emperors, amethyst is often considered the color of royalty and was once prized even more than diamonds. Often referred to as the Bishop's Stone, amethyst was worn by bishops to symbolize their triumph over worldly vices. Darker hues of amethyst are rarely enhanced to perfect their color, although some varieties do respond well to heat enhancement. Amethyst is considered the most highly prized variety of quartz, and comes in a range of purple shades that vary in intensity from pale lilac to deep purple. Deposits for amethyst are found in Brazil, Uruguay, Madagascar, and regions of Africa. Avoid direct sunlight or extreme or prolonged heat, as this can cause damage and fading. Amethyst ranks 7 on the Mohs Scale of Hardness.

James Avery's birthstone jewelery for March

March

Lab-Created Aqua Spinel

Centuries ago, in Sanskrit writings, spinel was called the daughter of ruby, adored, yet somehow different. The Crown Jewels of Great Britain are graced with spinels and have resided in the regalia of kingdoms throughout history. Found in Myanmar (Burma) and Sri Lanka, spinel is a durable gemstone that comes in a variety of colors including oranges, pinks, blues, lavenders, mauves and vivid reds. Lab-created spinel has been on the market since the 1920's. Spinel ranks 8 on the Mohs Scale of Hardness. Learn more about lab-created gemstones.

James Avery's birthstone jewelery for April

April

Diamond & White Sapphire

Diamond - Derived from the Latin diamas meaning the unconquerable, diamond has maintained its position throughout history as a perfect icon for love and marriage. Although white is the most common color, diamonds actually come in a variety of colorful hues. The diamond is the only gemstone to rank 10 on the Mohs Scale of Hardness.

Beloved for centuries, sapphire comes from the mineral corundum. The ancient Persian rulers believed that the earth rested on a giant sapphire and its reflection colored the heavens blue. A gift of a sapphire symbolizes a pledge of trust and loyalty. Sapphire is one of the most durable gemstones and comes in several colors including pink, white, blue and orange. However, they are most noted for their rich blue color. Sapphire ranks 9 on the Mohs Scale of Hardness. Learn more about lab-created gemstones.

James Avery's birthstone jewelery for May

May

Lab-Created Emerald

The word “emerald” comes from a Sanskrit word meaning “the green of growing things”. Legends gave emerald the power to make its wearer more intelligent and quick-witted. The first known emerald mines were in Egypt, dating back to over 300 B.C. Cleopatra was known to have a passion for emerald, and the stone was featured in many of her royal adornments. Emerald is the most famous member of the beryl family. Emerald ranks 7.5 to 8 on the Mohs Scale of Hardness. Learn more about lab-created gemstones.

James Avery's birthstone jewelery for June

June

Alexandrite

Named after Alexander II, Czar of Russia, alexandrite was discovered on this ruler’s birthday in the early 1830’s. Alexandrite is the color changing variety of the mineral chrysoberyl. It changes from blue-green in daylight or fluorescent light to red-purple in lamp or candlelight. Alexandrite ranks 8.5 on the Mohs Scale of Hardness. Learn more about lab-created gemstones.

James Avery's birthstone jewelery for July

July

Lab-Created Ruby

Celebrated in the Bible and in ancient Sanskrit writings as the most precious of all gemstones, rubies have been the prized possession of emperors and kings throughout the ages. Ruby’s inner fire has been the inspiration for innumerable legends and myths, and to this day no red gemstone can compare to its rich hues. Many people associate its brilliant crimson colors with passion and love. Ruby is the red variety of the corundum mineral species. Rubies can only be red, but are offered in various shades such as pink-red, purple-red, or a brown-red. Ruby ranks 9 on the Mohs Scale of Hardness. Learn more about lab-created gemstones.

James Avery's birthstone jewelery for August

August

Peridot

Peridot is one of the few gemstones that exist only in the color of green. The Romans noticed its color did not change in artificial light, so they named the stone “evening emerald”. It is found in the U.S. in Arizona and New Mexico, Burma, Pakistan and China. Peridot ranks 6.5 to 7 on the Mohs Scale of Hardness.

James Avery's birthstone jewelery for September

September

Lab-Created Blue Sapphire

Beloved for centuries, sapphire comes from the mineral corundum. The ancient Persian rulers believed that the earth rested on a giant sapphire and its reflection colored the heavens blue. A gift of a sapphire symbolizes a pledge of trust and loyalty. Sapphire is one of the most durable gemstones and comes in several colors including pink, white, blue and orange. However, they are most noted for their rich blue color. Sapphire ranks 9 on the Mohs Scale of Hardness. Learn more about lab-created gemstones.

James Avery's birthstone jewelery for October

October

Lab-Created Pink Sapphire

Beloved for centuries, sapphire comes from the mineral corundum. The ancient Persian rulers believed that the earth rested on a giant sapphire and its reflection colored the heavens blue. A gift of a sapphire symbolizes a pledge of trust and loyalty. Sapphire is one of the most durable gemstones and comes in several colors including pink, white, blue and orange. However, they are most noted for their rich blue color. Sapphire ranks 9 on the Mohs Scale of Hardness. Learn more about lab-created gemstones.

James Avery's birthstone jewelery for November

November

Citrine

Named after the French word for lemon, many citrines have a bright, sunny yellow color. Citrines are also available in hues ranging from gold to orange-brown. Brownish varieties are commonly heated and magically turn into the bright yellow or orange colors. This enhancement method is permanent and will endure for the life of the gemstone. During the romantic era of the 1800’s, citrine was said to symbolize joy and lightheartedness. Citrine is a member of the quartz family, and natural citrine deposits are mined mostly in Brazil, but also in Madagascar, the U.S., Spain, Russia, France, and Scotland. Citrine should be kept away from prolonged exposure to strong light or heat, which may damage or fade the stone. Citrine ranks 7 on the Mohs Scale of Hardness.

James Avery's birthstone jewelery for December

December

Blue Topaz & Blue Zircon

In the middle ages, zircon was said to aid sleep, bring prosperity, and promote honor and wisdom to those who wear it. Though zircon is available in many colors thanks to a heat enhancement process, it is most often sought in blue, and is famous for its luster and fire. Major sources of zircon are found in Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam. Avoid rough wear since these stones tend to abrade. Zircon ranks 7.5 on the Mohs Scale of Hardness.